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25-10-2019 | Edited News

Bi-weekly press briefing: Protests around the world - OHCHR

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SHOTLIST 

 

  1. Wide shot: briefing room Palais des Nations Geneva

SOUNDBITE (English)— Ravina ShamdasaniSpokesperson for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR): “As you are all aware current or very recent protests, some of which we will talk about today, include ones taking place in Bolivia, Chile, Hong Kong, Ecuador, Egypt, Guinea, Haiti, Iraq and Lebanon. And of course, we have also seen major protests taking place earlier in the year in Algeria, Honduras, Nicaragua, Malawi, Russia, Sudan Zimbabwe, as well as in a number of EU countries, including France, Spain and the UK. And this list is far from exhaustive, there are several other that we have not mentioned here.”

  1. Cut away: Medium shot Audience attending the press briefing
  2. SOUNDBITE (English)— Ravina Shamdasani, Spokesperson for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR): “Of course the reasons behind these protests are complex and varied, and it is important not to come to sweeping conclusions. There are common threads among many of the protests: populations that are fed up and angry, especially with socio-economic conditions, corruption, inequalities and the general widening gap between rich and poor.” 
  3. Cut away: Journalists typing
  4. SOUNDBITE (English)— Ravina Shamdasani, Spokesperson for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR): “These sentiments are exacerbated by growing mistrust of institutions of government, politicians and ruling elites. Some protests have been triggered by one or two specific developments, and have then metamorphosed into expressions of deep public dissatisfaction on a whole range of issues spanning the political, social and economic spectrum.”
  5. Cut away:  journalist typing
  6. SOUNDBITE (English)— Ravina Shamdasani, Spokesperson for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR): “Some have been fanned by poor government responses or by excessive use of force against the initial protestors, which have brought tens of thousands more people into the streets in solidarity with those who have been killed, injured or arrested by security forces who in many cases have failed to abide by international standards governing use of force, and tried to obstruct fundamental human rights such as freedom of peaceful assembly and association, and of expression.”
  7. Cut away: Various cut aways  

Spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights: Ravina Shamdasani on  protests and unrest around the world

Date: 25 October 2019

Location: Geneva

Subject: Press briefing Ravina Shamdasani, Spokesperson for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)

At the United Nations briefing in Geneva Ravina Shamdasani spokesperson for the Office of the UN high Commissioner for Human Rights, comments on the Protests and unrest around the world.

SOUNDBITE (English)— Ravina ShamdasaniSpokesperson for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) “As you are all aware current or very recent protests, some of which we will talk about today, include ones taking place in Bolivia, Chile, Hong Kong, Ecuador, Egypt, Guinea, Haiti, Iraq and Lebanon. And of course, we have also seen major protests taking place earlier in the year in Algeria, Honduras, Nicaragua, Malawi, Russia, Sudan Zimbabwe, as well as in a number of EU countries, including France, Spain and the UK. And this list is far from exhaustive, there are several other that we have not mentioned here.”

 

Of course, the reasons behind these protests are complex and varied, and it is important not to come to sweeping conclusions. There are common threads among many of the protests: populations that are fed up and angry, especially with socio-economic conditions, corruption, inequalities and the general widening gap between rich and poor. 

 

These sentiments are exacerbated by growing mistrust of institutions of government, politicians and ruling elites. Some protests have been triggered by one or two specific developments, and have then metamorphosed into expressions of deep public dissatisfaction on a whole range of issues spanning the political, social and economic spectrum.

 

Some have been fanned by poor government responses or by excessive use of force against the initial protestors, which have brought tens of thousands more people into the streets in solidarity with those who have been killed, injured or arrested by security forces who in many cases have failed to abide by international standards governing use of force, and tried to obstruct fundamental human rights such as freedom of peaceful assembly and association, and of expression.”

 

ENDS

 

For more information and media requests, please contact: Rupert Colville - + 41 22 917 9767/rcolville@ohchr.org or Ravina Shamdasani - + 41 22 917 9169/rshamdasani@ohchr.org or Marta Hurtado - + 41 22 917 9466/mhurtado@ohchr.org

 

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