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Edited Story / 3:28 / MP4 / 256 MB

23-08-2022 | Edited News

Bi-Weekly Press Briefing: Ukraine Update OHCHR - WHO - WFP - UNICEF

ENG

STORY:  Ukraine Update OHCHR WFP WHO UNICEF

TRT: 03:28”
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS
ASPECT RATIO: 16:9 

DATELINE:  23 August 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND 

 

SHOTLIST

 

  1. Medium shot, UN Geneva flag alley.
  2. Wide shot, press room with panel of speakers.
  3. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Ravina Shamdasani, Spokesperson for OHCHR: “We are concerned by reports that the Russian Federation and affiliated armed groups in Donetsk are planning, possibly in the coming days, to try Ukrainian prisoners of war in what is being labelled an "international tribunal" in Mariupol. While there are few details available, photos and video footage published in the media and on social media appear to show metal cages being built in Mariupol’s Philharmonic Hall, apparently to restrain prisoners of war during proceedings.”
  4. Close lateral shot, Ravina Shamdasani speaking.
  5. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Ravina Shamdasani, Spokesperson for OHCHR: “Under international law, individuals entitled to prisoner of war status have combatant immunity and cannot be prosecuted for having participated in hostilities or for lawful acts of war committed in the course of the armed conflict. Even if such acts would otherwise constitute an offence under domestic law.”
  6. Close shot, journalists taking notes.
  7. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Ravina Shamdasani, Spokesperson for OHCHR: “We're furthermore concerned that prisoners of war have generally been held without access to independent monitors, exposing them to the risk of being tortured to extract a confession. There have also been worrying public statements by Russian officials and members of affiliated armed groups labelling Ukrainian prisoners of war as "war criminals, as Nazis and as terrorists," thereby undermining the presumption of innocence.”
  8. Medium lateral shot, journalists and UN staff listening and taking notes.
  9. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Dr Jarno Habicht, WHO Representative and Head of WHO Country Office in Ukraine: “We have seen an unprecedented number of attacks on health care that has been recorded now over the last six months. As of 23 August, over 460 attacks on health care have been verified by WHO, leading to almost 100 deaths and over 100 injuries, while that number continues.”
  10. Medium shot, journalist taking notes.
  11. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Dr Jarno Habicht, WHO Representative and Head of WHO Country Office in Ukraine: “While these attacks are not only a violation of international law, they also bear a barrier for many who need to care as we are going through the war. So it is not only the supplies and others we need to support. We need to ensure also that the services are available.”
  12. Wide shot, press room with panel of speakers.
  13. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Michael Dunford, WFP Regional Director For East Africa: “The MV Brave Commander is currently under siege, having left Ukraine. We're expecting it to berth in Djibouti on the 30th. That's the latest arrival date. Now, this is a very positive development, but it's not the answer.”
  14. Medium shot, journalist taking notes.
  15. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Michael Dunford, WFP Regional Director For East Africa: “That one ship, 23,000 metric tons of wheat, is the equivalent of feeding 1.5 million people for just one month, and yet we currently estimate that there could be upwards of 22 million people requiring assistance.”
  16. Close shot, screen showing speaker talking.
  17. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) James Elder, Spokesperson for UNICEF: “The official number of children killed, at least in Ukraine, is 356. But it is a low estimate, as you know, because we expect it, unfortunately, to be many more based on the thoroughness of how verification is done.”
  18. Medium shot, journalist taking notes.
  19. Close shot, journalist writing.
  20. Medium shot, journalists taking notes.

 

The United Nations Human Rights Office (OHCHR) expressed concern on Tuesday after photos and videos on social media appeared to show metal cages being built in the philharmonic hall in Ukraine's Mariupol, apparently to restrain Ukrainian prisoners of war (POWs) during proceedings. 

OHCHR spokesperson Ravina Shamdasani said the trials by the Russian-backed authorities could come - possibly within days - and warned that such a process could amount to a war crime.

"We are very concerned about the manner in which this is being done. There are pictures in the media of cages being built in Mariupol's philharmonic hall, really massive cages and apparently, the idea is to restrain the prisoners," Ms. Shamdasani told a briefing in Geneva. "This is not acceptable, this is humiliating," she said.

Ms. Shamdasani pointed out how “under international law, individuals entitled to prisoner of war status have combatant immunity and cannot be prosecuted for having participated in hostilities, or for lawful acts of war committed in the course of the armed conflict, even if such acts would otherwise constitute an offence under domestic law." 

The spokesperson added that OHCHR was concerned that prisoners of war have generally been held without access to independent monitors, exposing them to the risk of being tortured to extract a confession.

"There have also been worrying public statements by Russian officials and members of affiliated armed groups labelling Ukrainian prisoners of war as ‘war criminals, ‘Nazis’, and ‘terrorists’, thereby undermining the presumption of innocence."

The World Health Organization (WHO) warned that it has seen “an unprecedented number of attacks on healthcare,” since the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which began nearly six months ago.

“As of 23rd of August, over 460 attacks on health care have been verified by WHO, leading to almost 100 deaths and over 100 injuries,” Dr. Jarno Habicht, WHO Representative and Head of WHO Country Office in Ukraine said. 

Dr. Habicht stressed that “while these attacks are not only the violation of international law, they are also a barrier for many who need to care.”

“It is not only the supplies and others we need to support –  we need to ensure also that the services are available,” he added.  

According to the UN Children’s Fund, (UNICEF), officially 356 children have been killed in Ukraine during the war with Russia. Speaking in Geneva, UNICEF spokesperson, James Elder acknowledged it “is a low estimate,” but they “expect it to be many more based on the thoroughness of how verification is done”.

On Monday, UNICEF reported that nearly 1,000 children had been killed or injured in Ukraine (on average five children per day) but the real number is likely higher.  Reiterating the urgent need for peace,  UNICEF Executive Director Catherine Russell pointed out that “once again, as in all wars, the reckless decisions of adults are putting children at extreme risk. There are no armed operations of this kind that do not result in children being harmed.” 

According to the World Food Programme (WFP) the first vessel transporting Ukrainian wheat grain to the Horn of Africa is due to berth in Djibouti on  30 August. 

The MV Brave Commander departed from the Black Sea port of Yuzhny on 16 August, as part of the Black Sea Grain Initiative signed by Ukraine, Russia, Türkiye and the UN in July. But Michael Dunford, WFP Regional Director for East Africa, warned that while this was “a very positive development,” it was “not the answer”. 

“That one ship, 23,000 metric tons of wheat, is the equivalent of feeding 1.5 million people for just one month. And yet we currently estimate that there could be upwards of 22 million people requiring assistance,” he said.


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