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21-10-2022 | Edited News

Integrated Child Spot for Ukrainian IDP's in Lviv - UNICEF 21 October 2022

ENG

STORY: SPILNO Child Spot for Ukrainian IDP’s in Lviv - UNICEF

TRT: 2 mins 19s

SOURCE: UNTV CH

RESTRICTIONS: NONE

LANGUAGE: UKRAINIAN/NATS

ASPECT RATIO: 16:9

DATELINE: 21 October 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

 

SHOTLIST 

  1. Wide shot and traveling, entering Lviv city
  2. Wide shot, tram passing by
  3. Wide shot, Lviv mayor’s office with poster of Azuvstal “Free Mariupol Defenders”
  4. Medium shot, sandbags in front of windows
  5. Medium shot, cars passing next to war graffiti on the wall
  6. Wide shot, Lviv city center, pedestrian zone
  7. Medium shot, lady passing by military nets on sidewalk
  8. Medium shot, man entering Shelter “FC Shakhtar Donetsk”
  9. Wide shot, reception of shelter
  10. Close up, Ukrainian flag
  11. Close up, poster “Football for Peace” - FC Shakhtar
  12. Wide shot, people sitting on mattresses
  13. Medium shot, people sitting on mattresses
  14. Close up, Teddy on bed
  15. Medium shot, lady walking in UNICEF Blue dot center
  16. Medium shot, UNICEF staff talking to a little boy
  17. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) – Yulia Repina, SPILNO centre staff: We do different activities with the children. There are sessions with psychologists every Sunday, different classes: painting, football as well. Our objective is to keep them busy because these kids are constantly in stress”.
  18. Medium shot, elderly woman cutting clothes for military nets
  19. Medium shot, women putting clothes together to a military net
  20. Medium shot, boy showing his game on cell phone
  21. Wide shot, children playing on the floor
  22. Close up, painting
  23. Medium shot, little girl playing puzzle
  24. Medium shot, UNICEF staff hugging a little girl
  25. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) – Yulia Repina, SPILNO centre staff: Here [we have] children who come running from shelling. They are very stressed and we need to keep them busy with something. So that they could take change focus, calm down a bit and rest a little from all these [horrors] that they saw”.   
  26. Close up, interactive map of fighting on frontlines on screen
  27. Medium shot, little girl sitting under table
  28. Medium shot, UNICEF staff hugging girl
  29. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) – Yulia Repina, SPILNO centre staff: “All the children are very cool. Every child is a part of you and this is a bit tiring because they are leaving and they are also sad about it. They pass by, write, call us and myself - and this is really great, … but many of them are going abroad and most probably it will be somewhat calmer and safer for them there. This is good.”
  30. Wide shot, people preparing food in kitchen
  31. Wide shot, group of boys sitting and eating
  32. Medium shot, elderly lady sitting and eating
  33. Wide shot, families having lunch
  34. Close up, little boy waving into the camera
  35. Wide shot, exterior, flower in a sandbag on a sidewalk

STORYLINE

As missile attacks by Russian armed forces have increasingly struck cities across Ukraine during the month of October, targeting civilian infrastructure as people are taking children to school, the need for child protection services and access to safe spaces for children has never been felt more keenly since the start of the war.

Lviv, the western Ukrainian city located some 60 kilometers from the Polish border, has become a transit point for families fleeing fighting in eastern, southern and central Ukraine. Today, there are more than 10 so called “SPILNO Child spots” supported by UNICEF in the Lviv region. They offer safe spaces for children and their families and the chance to learn, play and make new friends, after months of war.

Since the onset of the war in February 2022, several thousands families have registered in one of the biggest shelters here in Lviv, where they’ve been received by volunteer workers of the football club FC Shakhtar Donetsk. Families staying at the shelter include people who have lost everything, or whose homes are now under Russian occupation.  It’s a new start and new friends for the children at the SPILNO spot.

“We do different activities with the children”, explained Yulia Repina, a SPILNO centre staff, working with the children at an integrated Child Spot located in an IDP center in Lviv. “There are sessions with psychologists every Sunday, different classes: painting, football as well. Our objective is to keep them busy because these kids are constantly in stress”,

Yulia and her colleagues are hosting around 50 to 60 children per day. For them, the “SPILNO centres” provide a safe, welcoming space to rest, play and simply be a child, at a time when their world has been abruptly turned upside down in fear and panic, and they are facing the trauma of leaving family, friends, and all what is familiar. They can benefit from psychosocial support such as art therapy from trained staff to meet their unique needs.

“Here we have children who come running from shelling. They are very stressed and we need to keep them busy with something. So that they could take change focus, calm down a bit and rest a little from all these horrors that they saw”, said Yulia Repina.

Some of the families stay here for a couple of days, others will have to stay longer as they lost their documents and need to request new ones before moving onward to other European countries or they try to find a new place to rent in Lviv. On average, the internally displaced people (IDP) stay one month. During that time, children and parents are involved in all the activities at the shelter such as cooking, cleaning, and also sewing military nets.

For Ms Repina “all the children are very cool. Every child is a part of you and this is a bit tiring because they are leaving and they are also sad about it”. She added that “they pass by, write, call us and myself - and this is really great, … but many of them are going abroad and most probably it will be somewhat calmer and safer for them there. This is good.”

-ends-

 


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