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08-11-2022 | Edited News

Bi-Weekly Press Briefing 08 November 2022 : Impact on climate crisis on most vulnerable - UNICEF

ENG

STORY: Impact on climate crisis on most vulnerable - UNICEF 

TRT: 1 min 52 s

SOURCE: UNTV CH

RESTRICTIONS: NONE

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/NATS

ASPECT RATIO: 16:9

DATELINE: 08 November 2022 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

 

SHOTLIST 

  1. Wide shot, UN Geneva flag alley.
  2. Wide shot, press room with panel of speakers and cameraman.
  3. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) - UNICEF’s Global Director of Communications and Advocacy, Paloma Escudero: “According to a UNICEF analysis released today,7 million children in 27 countries have been impacted by flooding so far in this year.”
  4. Close-up shot, hands of journalists taking notes.
  5. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) UNICEF’s Global Director of Communications and Advocacy, Paloma Escudero: “UNICEF also urges world leaders to agree immediate funding for the children who are facing, and will be facing, irreversible climate losses and damages. Governments must close the finance gap for addressing loss and damage at COP27. Decisions about climate change included in these halls at COP27 in Sharm el-Sheikh need to be inclusive, especially of young people from the most-affected places.”
  6. Medium shot, journalists and screen showing speakers.
  7. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) UNICEF’s Global Director of Communications and Advocacy, Paloma Escudero: “Right now, Pakistan is drowning in the world’s inaction. One of the most important but heartbreaking things about climate change is that its most horrific impacts are often reserved for those who are least responsible for creating the problem.”
  8. Close-up shot, pressroom with camera and journalists.
  9. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) UNICEF’s Global Director of Communications and Advocacy, Paloma Escudero: “In Africa, just like in Pakistan, children are paying the price for a climate disaster not of their making. From the extreme drought and risk of famine in Somalia to the erratic rains across the Sahel, UNICEF is being challenged to respond at an unprecedented scale to emergencies that have all the markings of climate-induced disasters.”
  10. Medium shot, speakers panel and tv screen.
  11. Close-up shot, hands of journalists taking notes.
  12. Medium shot, press room with panel of speakers.
  13. Close-up shot, press room and journalists.

 

Almost 28 million children have been impacted this year by record flooding in 27 countries. A large majority of those children affected by flooding in 2022 are among the most vulnerable and are at high risk of a multitude of threats including death by drowning, disease outbreaks, lack of safe drinking water, malnutrition, disruption in learning, and violence.

“According to a UNICEF analysis released today, 27.7 million children in 27 countries have been impacted by flooding so far in this year”, said Paloma Escudero, UNICEF’s Global Director of Communications and Advocacy while speaking from the COP27 in Sharm el-Sheikh to journalists at the United Nations in Geneva.

UNICEF together with youth climate activists from around the world, are drawing the spotlight at the UN Climate Change Conference to the impact of the climate crisis on the poorest children and are challenging world leaders to also respond at an unprecedented scale. Governments must prevent a climate catastrophe by rapidly reducing emissions.

UNICEF also urges world leaders to agree immediate funding for the children who are facing, and will be facing, irreversible climate losses and damages", said Paloma Escudero. "Governments must close the finance gap for addressing loss and damage at COP27. Decisions about climate change included in these halls at COP27 in Sharm el-Sheikh need to be inclusive, especially of young people from the most-affected places.”

 According to UNICEF, Pakistan’s floods in June 2022, the worst in 100 years, have killed at least 615 children, and left 10 million girls and boys in immediate need of lifesaving support. The floods have contaminated drinking water, which is spawning deadly water-borne diseases such as acute watery diarrhea, which compounds already acute malnutrition. Estimates suggest close to 1.6 million children in flood areas could be suffering from severe acute malnutrition.

Right now, Pakistan is drowning in the world’s inaction », said UNICEF’s Global Communications Director. “One of the most important but heartbreaking things about climate change is that its most horrific impacts are often reserved for those who are least responsible for creating the problem.”

The aftermath of floods is often more deadly for children than the extreme weather events that caused the flooding. In 2022, floods have contributed to the increased spread of major killers of children, such as malnutrition, malaria, cholera and diarrhea.

In addition to threatening the lives of millions of children, the flood waters have disrupted essential services and displaced countless families.

In Africa, just like in Pakistan, children are paying the price for a climate disaster not of their making », said Paloma Escudero. “From the extreme drought and risk of famine in Somalia to the erratic rains across the Sahel, UNICEF is being challenged to respond at an unprecedented scale to emergencies that have all the markings of climate-induced disasters.”

UNICEF’s immediate humanitarian response to flood affected countries is wide-ranging across all sectors: health, nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), child protection, and education. However, a lack of funding has hampered the response in many countries.

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